iPad Weekly Bulletin – Issue 4 (App focus – Maths)

This is the Fourth weekly bulletin with a review / discussion of Tellagami and Flipboard. There is a subject focus on Maths apps.

Click here to download the Bulletin

Picture 4

iPad Weekly Bulletin – Issue 3 (App focus – PE)

This is the third weekly bulletin. Three apps – Stick Pick, Animoto and Lucidchart are discussed / reviewed. The subject focus of the week for apps is Physical Education.

Click here to download the bulletin

iPad Bulletin 3 - new

iPad Weekly Bulletin – Issue 2

This is the second weekly bulletin with a particular focus on Evernote as the featured app.

Click Here to download the bulletin

iPad Bulletin 2

iPad Weekly Bulletin – Issue 1

iPad bulletin banner
In my role in supporting the integration of iPads in the classroom I am currently trying to write a weekly bulletin to support colleagues. Each bulletin has an Apps section in which one or two key apps are featured and reviewed / discussed each week as well as suggestions for subject-specific apps. I have also started to have a ‘featured’ department each week with a collection of subject specific apps. I will try and upload them on here to share with others for those colleagues in other schools who are just starting out on the ‘iPad path’ and might find some of the information useful. I will post the four bulletins which have already been published now and then update the blog each week with the most recent bulletin. I hope they are useful to some of you.

Click Here for the First Edition iPad Bulletin 1

New online KS3 Geography resource on the Coffee Trade – Costa for Schools

Costa for SchoolsTeaching about trade? A fantastic new interactive online physical and human geography resource aimed at 11-14 year olds has just been launched supporting the KS3 geography curriculum. The site provides a great set of free online resources from the Costa Foundation exploring the coffee trade around the world and how it affects the lives of coffee growing communities. There are a vast range of detailed case studies and lots of resources and teaching ideas. Although it is mainly aimed at KS3 there is a vast array of case study material here which could be adapted for use with older students.

interactive map

There is an Interactive Map providing an online journey of the coffee bean from crop to cup with detail on exports of different countries and a more detailed focus on ‘case study’ countries. The map links to case studies from the Costa Foundation and Rainforest Alliance’s work in the coffee belt countries, from Guatemala to Vietnam, and really brings Human & Physical Geography to life!

Tracking the journey of the coffee bean, students learn how the coffee trade helps these communities grow and protects ecosystems:

 

Students ask and understand:

•           where coffee comes from

•           how coffee can improve lives

•           and how it can make the world a better place.

Case Studies

There some great free resources for teachers, including comprehensive lesson plans that cover core aspects of the KS 3 Geography curriculum including:   Space,  Interdependence, Cultural understanding and diversity, Graphicacy. (Curriculum links are detailed in accompanying teachers’ notes).

As well as an introductory PowerPoint which provides a history of coffee farming and the processes involved from crop to cup there are 3 key lesson plans..

Lesson 1 - Where does our coffee come from, and why does it matter?

Lesson 2 – How can coffee improve lives?

Lesson 3 - Can coffee make the world a better place?

Each lesson can be downloaded as a zipfile – they can be used in conjunction with the website for interactivity where internet access is available or they are also designed to be able to be used off line and there are a range of worksheets / information sheets and powerpoints.

Stick Pick – App for supporting questioning in the classroom

Picture3Picture2

This is an app that I am just start to play around with for my GCSE and VI form groups to help me look more at questioning. You can set up a class and each student has a named ‘virtual’ lollipop stick. When you create the students stick you can allocate this stick a question stem mode (Bloom’s, Bloom’s Revised or ELS) and level of difficulty (e.g. knowledge / comprehension/ analysis etc.). There is also an option to just create the stick with no question specifically attached if you just want to use it as a random way of selecting students. It is possible once a student has been selected once to set their stick as used so it wont be added back in the can and they wont be picked again that session.

If you have set the stick to have a question stem mode, each time the student’s stick is drawn you will be given over a dozen questions (e.g. related to Bloom’s Taxonomy) these will be tied to the learner’s individual ability level which you will have set when you allocated each student a stick.

This video gives a quick overview of some of the functionality.

As you can see on the video the app gives you the options to use Blooms or ESL (English as a second language), therefore Questions can be linked to cognitive / linguistic needs.  You can set up multiple cans (classes) filled with sticks (students).

Picture1

If you want to take it further you can track formative assessment for each question. On asking a question, by clicking ‘assess’ by the students name, you can then select a corresponding correct, incorrect, or opinion button based on the student’s answer. On the basis of your selection you then also have option to rate the answer.

There are aspects of this you wouldn’t necessarily want to be showing on the board at all times – for example the assessment you make for a student wouldn’t necessarily be suitable to share with all students – but you don’t have to use the assessment part at all – indeed I think I am going to be able to make good use of just the ‘random’ selection tool and the question stems.ng a question by clicking ‘assess’ by the students name, you can then select a corresponding correct, incorrect, or opinion button based on the student’s answer. On the basis of your selection you then also have option to rate the answer.

There is another video here with a teacher review of the app.

Creating shortcuts on your iPad ‘home screen’

photo (1)

It is possible to create shortcuts on your iPad home screen, just like you would do on the desktop of a PC. This is particularly useful for sites that you will use frequently.

To create the shortcut simply navigate to the website that you want to create a direct link to. Then click on the ‘sharing’ button at the top – this will bring up a series of options – e.g. email, text etc.. select “Add to Home Screen” and a link will be created for you!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 57 other followers